What Happens When You Lose a Filling?

Having a cavity filled is a necessary procedure that is unfortunately very expensive and sometimes a little painful. However, fillings are not full-proof and can often fall out from eating certain foods that jostle it out of your tooth. In some instances, you may not even realize that you have lost a filling and may have even swallowed it. In the end, losing a filling isn’t a major immediate emergency, but it should not be ignored.

When It Comes Out

If you realize your filling has come out when it has happened and you haven’t already swallowed it, you should remove it from your mouth to prevent yourself from swallowing it. If you have swallowed it, it usually passes through your system without a problem. However, if you swallow it and you breathe it into your lungs, it could cause an infection.

Call Your Dentist

You should call your dentist as soon as you lose your filling if it’s within business hours to make a new appointment as soon as possible to replace the filling. If you recently got the filling or it was recently replaced, your dentist should replace it for free especially if it was an issue with the bonding of the filling when it was being put in.

Keeping it Clean

If you are not able to get to your dentist that day to have it refilled, you will need to keep that area of your tooth really clean. The cavity that was filled is now exposed again and could worsen or feel really sensitive. Brush your teeth carefully making sure to remove any food debris from the cavity so that harmful bacteria does not accumulate.

Pain

Your tooth may be sensitive after you lose your filing. This may be caused by exposed dentin tubules, which are tiny pathways of communication between the dentin and the pulp of your tooth. The dentin tubules provide a direct pathway from the inside of your mouth to your tooth. If you do feel pain, you can take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen, Advil or Tylenol.

Allergic Reactions to Food

Allergic reactions to food may be an inconvenience or mild annoyance or could be severe and life threatening. According to the Cleveland Clinic, a small number of foods are responsible for the majority of allergic reactions to foods. Although most allergic reactions to foods develop during childhood, new allergies to food may develop in adulthood as well.

Significance

Allergic reactions to food result from an excessive response by the immune system to a protein in food. According to the Cleveland Clinic, 8 percent of children and 1 to 2 percent of adults in the United States have some type of food allergy. Allergic reactions to food can be mild and short-lived or could be severe—even fatal—if not urgently treated.

Types

According to the Mayo Clinic, allergic reactions to food may be moderate allergies or severe anaphylaxis. Some allergic reactions may be induced by exercising shortly after eating. Other types of allergic reactions may result from cross-reactivity of proteins in vegetables and fruits to pollen in the air.

Features

According to the Cleveland Clinic, the six foods that most frequently cause allergic reactions in children are cow’s milk, wheat, soy, tree nuts, eggs and peanuts. In adults, the most common allergic reactions to foods are from peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and fish. According to the Mayo Clinic, cooked fruits and vegetables will not cause allergic reactions.

Identification

Food allergies may be diagnosed by a doctor after exposure to a food that caused an allergic reaction. Allergic reactions to food may also be identified by tests done in a doctor’s office. Either a skin scratch test using common allergens or an antibody blood test may be done to diagnose allergies to specific foods.

Considerations

Food labels may use many different names for certain ingredients. Milk may also be identified as casein, whey, whey protein, sodium caseinate, or lactoglobulin.
Food allergies are more common during childhood and may be outgrown. Children who are breast-fed are less likely to develop allergies than those who are fed formula.

Prevention/Solution

The best way to prevent allergic reactions to food is to avoid known allergens and get tested after an allergy is suspected. Waiting until after six months of age to feed an infant solid foods may prevent allergies from occurring. Reading food labels and avoiding unlabeled foods may prevent allergic reactions. People who are prone to severe allergic reactions to foods should carry their medicine and an allergy card that identifies the allergies.

Warning

Cross-contamination of foods prepared in restaurants may result in exposure to an offending food. A person who has dizziness, difficulty breathing, or fainting after eating a food should call emergency medical services. Severe allergic reactions to food require immediate medical treatment due to the risk of shock or death.